Nonprofit Organizations and Arts Education in a Rural Community

Elise Lael Kieffer, Murray State University
Elise Lael Kieffer, Murray State University

Elise Lael Kieffer, Ph.D.
Program Director and Assistant Professor
Nonprofit Leadership Studies,
Organizational Communication and Leadership

Murray State University

Nonprofit Organizations and Arts Education in a Rural Community
Dr. Elise Lael Kieffer, Murray State University

Local Government Administration in Small Town America | Routledge, October 2023
Edited By James C. Clinger, Donna M. Handley, Wendy L. Eaton

In “Nonprofit Organizations and Arts Education in a Rural Community,” a book chapter published in Local Government Administration in Small Town America, Dr. Elise Lael Kieffer examines the vital role that nonprofit organizations play within areas throughout the US that are characterized by sparse populations. Through a detailed examination of an interdisciplinary arts education nonprofit in a rural Appalachian community, she highlights the unique challenges these organizations face, including navigating a complex local political landscape, dealing with the perceptions of being outsiders, and overcoming the hurdles of sustained funding shortages. Her analysis also includes a comparison to the experiences of their urban counterparts, reflecting the added complexity of operating within small-town dynamics where interpersonal relationships and long-standing family histories significantly influence local politics and resource allocation.

Kieffer’s chapter offers insightful perspectives on the intersection of nonprofit management and community development in rural settings, underscoring the indispensable role nonprofits play in fostering arts education and broader community engagement in areas where government entities may fall short. Moreover, her findings emphasize the importance of understanding local context and building community relationships as fundamental strategies for nonprofit success in rural America. This work not only contributes to the academic discourse on rural nonprofit management but also serves as a practical guide for those looking to make a meaningful impact through nonprofit work in similar communities.

Dr. Kieffer’s first love was musical theatre. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Jacksonville University (Florida). After graduation, she began a successful career as a performing artist on the East Coast and Midwest. She left performance to return to school for her Master’s in Public Administration and Nonprofit Management from Tennessee State University. After earning that degree she moved to New York and worked for an international humanitarian aid organization, specializing in fundraising. While her primary assignment was growing the base of individual donors, she is also remembered for the dramatic growth in funding coming from foundations and corporations under her leadership.

The next chapter in her nonprofit sector journey combined her passion for the arts with her growing commitment to strengthening community engagement and building sustainable organizations. She moved to rural Cumberland County, Kentucky, at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains to found the Burkesville Academy of Fine Arts (BAFA). This interdisciplinary arts education organization offering year-round arts education and performance opportunities for children was launched in rural South- Central Kentucky. BAFA found strong support through local youth serving organizations such as 4-H and the public schools, becoming an integrated part of youth development across the region.

With a long-time aspiration to play a role in the development of leadership and management capacity for those serving the community, in 2017 her family relocated to Tallahassee, Florida, for Dr. Kieffer to pursue her PhD at Florida State University. While studying arts administration, with a focus on nonprofit leadership and management, she focused her research on strengthening rural nonprofit arts organizations. During her academic journey, she has pursued scholarship and engaged in teaching across the leadership and management curriculum. Among her many professional awards, it is worth noting that she was recognized with the Emerging Scholar Award at the International Society on the Arts in Society in 2019, 2020, and 2021. In addition, she received the Emerging Scholars Award at the International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities, and Nations in 2021.

Upon receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Kieffer joined Murray State University as Program Director and Assistant Professor of Nonprofit Leadership Studies and Director of the Murray State Nonprofit Resource Center. Her textbook “Rural Arts Management,” will be released by Routledge in July.

By |2024-02-22T11:39:01-05:00February 22nd, 2024|NACC Member Research|

North Korea’s Women-led Grassroots Capitalism

Dr. Bronwen Dalton and Dr. Kyungja Jung
Dr. Bronwen Dalton

Bronwen Dalton, PhD
Professor and Director,
Masters of Not-for-Profit
and Social Enterprise Program

Head Of Department (Management)
University of Technology, Sydney

Dr. Kyungja Jung

Kyungja Jung, PhD
Associate Professor
Social and Political Sciences Program
University of Technology, Sydney

North Korea’s Women-led Grassroots Capitalism
Dr. Bronwen Dalton and Dr. Kyungja Jung

Routledge (December 2023)

In their newly released book, North Korea’s Women-led Grassroots Capitalism, co-authors Bronwen Dalton and Kyungja Jung of the University of Technology, Sydney explore the transformative role of women in North Korea’s evolving economic landscape. Amidst the backdrop of North Korea’s economic and social transitions, the book uncovers a remarkable trend: the majority of traders and merchants in the country’s emerging informal market economy are women. This pivotal work provides an in-depth analysis of the intertwining of gender roles and economic changes in North Korea, offering a rich and detailed narrative based on extensive original research.

The book sheds light on the dynamic evolution of women’s roles in North Korean society, extending beyond economic participation to influence family relationships, cultural identity, and even issues of sexuality and reproduction. It seeks to offer a comprehensive understanding of the challenges and realities faced by North Korean women, painting a nuanced picture of their status and role in a society often perceived as rigidly totalitarian. Through the lens of these women’s experiences, the authors explore the limits of social control in North Korea, revealing a complex, layered society where women navigate both authoritarian structures and the constraints of a patriarchal system.

Set to be a significant contribution to the ASAA Women in Asia book series, “North Korea’s Women-led Grassroots Capitalism” is a must-read for scholars, academics, and practitioners in the field of nonprofit studies. It offers valuable insights into the agency of ordinary women in North Korea, challenging common perceptions and highlighting the multifaceted nature of social and economic change in this enigmatic country.

Dr. Bronwen Dalton is a distinguished academic and practitioner in the field of not-for-profit and social enterprise, currently serving as the Professor and Director of the Masters of Not-for-Profit and Social Enterprise Program at the University of Technology, Sydney. In addition to her academic role, she is the founder and CEO of Ruff Sleepers, a unique charity that washes the dogs of homeless individuals, advocating for the importance of pet ownership for mental and physical well-being and improved housing options for homeless pet owners. Dr. Dalton’s career has been marked by significant positions, including her tenure as the Co-Director of the UTS Centre for Cosmopolitan Civil Societies in 2015 and the National Manager of Research at Mission Australia in 2012.

Her academic credentials are equally impressive. Dr. Dalton completed her PhD at the University of Oxford, where she received the Oxford University Larkinson Award for Social Studies. She was also a recipient of the British Vice-Chancellors Committee Overseas Research Scholarship and the Korea Foundation Scholarship. Further enhancing her academic background, she holds a BA from the Australian National University and an MA from Yonsei University, Korea. Dr. Dalton’s research interests are extensive, covering topics like NFP childcare, social enterprises, advocacy, and international NGOs. She has published studies on these subjects, including a co-authored book on combating sex trafficking. Her expertise has led her to hold positions on various boards and editorial committees, including the Australia Korea Foundation and the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly journal. Notably, her profound interest in Korea led to her involvement as a Director of the National Korean Studies Centre and her significant research on North Korea’s economic transformation, especially the role of women in the emerging market economy, under an ARC Discovery grant.

Dr. Kyungja Jung, an Associate Professor in the Social and Political Sciences Program at the University of Technology, Sydney, is distinguished for her research driven by her involvement in women’s activism in Australia and Korea. Her work, deeply rooted in feminist theory and the intersectionality of gender and sexuality, focuses on areas such as women’s movements, policies related to women, challenges faced by North Korean female defectors, and violence against women, especially among migrant populations. Dr. Jung is recognized for her innovative approach to bringing gender perspectives to North Korean issues, a significant contribution to gender and Asian studies.

Her academic credentials include a pioneering doctoral thesis from the University of New South Wales, comparing civil society and women’s movements in South Korea and Australia. Dr. Jung’s impactful research has led to her receiving an ARC International Fellowship and has been featured in prestigious publications. She has authored several books, including “Practicing Feminism in South Korea: sexual violence and the women’s movement” and is currently working on “North Korea’s Women-led Grassroots Capitalism” with Professor Bronwen Dalton. A sought-after speaker, her research findings have been presented at various international forums, influencing debates and discussions in the field of women’s rights and social policy.

By |2023-12-07T08:59:04-05:00January 8th, 2024|NACC Member Research|

Two Perspectives on Nonprofit Management Education: Public Administration and Social Work

Dr. Roseanne Mirabella and Dr. Richard Hoefer
Roseanne Mirabella, PhD

Roseanne Mirabella, PhD
Professor
Department of Political Science and Public Affairs
Seton Hall University

Richard Hoefer, PhD

Richard Hoefer, PhD
Professor of Social Work
The University of Texas at Arlington

Two Perspectives on Nonprofit Management Education: Public Administration and Social Work
Dr. Roseanne Mirabella and Dr. Richard Hoefer

Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, Vol. 13 No. 4 (2023): Special Issue: Disciplinary Perspectives in Nonprofit Management

The latest Special Issue of the Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, “Disciplinary Perspectives in Nonprofit Management,” includes a thought-provoking piece co-authored by Roseanne Mirabella, Professor at Seton Hall University, and Richard Hoefer, Professor of Social Work at The University of Texas at Arlington. Their article, “Two Perspectives on Nonprofit Management Education: Public Administration and Social Work,” takes a unique approach by directly comparing and contrasting these two disciplines. This Special Issue aims to underscore the uniqueness of various disciplines in understanding nonprofit organizations and education.

Mirabella and Hoefer’s contribution is pivotal in highlighting how nonprofit management is inherently interdisciplinary, drawing on insights from both public administration and social work. They argue that the intellectual trajectories, frameworks, and questions characteristic of each discipline significantly influence the development and teaching of their respective curricula. The authors adeptly navigate through four key areas: the historical roots of each discipline, their core values, the challenges faced in management education within these fields, and their responses to critical perspectives in nonprofit management education. By examining the evolution and fundamental values of public administration and social work, the article sheds light on current challenges and the importance of incorporating alternative, critical perspectives in nonprofit management education. This piece is not just an academic comparison but a call to deepen our understanding of these disciplines’ contributions to shaping effective nonprofit management education today.

Roseanne M. Mirabella, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Political Science and Public Affairs at Seton Hall University. She conducts research on philanthropy and nonprofit education and critical perspectives on nonprofit organizing. She has authored or co-authored several papers and one co-edited book “Reframing Nonprofit Organizations: Democracy, Inclusion and Social Change” exploring the ways in which nonprofit management education programs can prepare students both to lead organizations as well as for their important role as advocates for the communities they serve, particularly communities that have been historically marginalized. She is past President of the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA), the New Jersey Chapter of the American Society for Public Administration, and is a member of the ARNOVA Critical Perspectives Leadership Team.

Dr. Richard Hoefer, a Professor of Social Work at The University of Texas at Arlington, is deeply committed to enhancing the effectiveness of human service agencies. His professional mission is centered around the critical question, “What makes for a more effective human service agency?” This inquiry drives his multifaceted interests in program evaluation, administration, advocacy, and budgeting within the realm of social work. Dr. Hoefer is particularly passionate about improving understanding of the policy process, empowering social workers to create positive change in the world. His research spans a wide range of areas including nonprofit capacity building, organization management, advocacy, civic engagement, American and Swedish social policy, and program evaluation. He imparts knowledge in these same areas as an educator, author, and consultant. Dr. Hoefer’s commitment to providing research-based solutions is a testament to his dedication to addressing societal problems, organizational challenges, and the needs of clients, students, and the broader community with respect, fairness, and competence.

By |2023-12-11T09:54:27-05:00January 8th, 2024|NACC Member Research|

Building Adaptive Capacity to Address Coastal Flooding: The Case of a Small Texas City

Dr. Karabi C. Bezboruah, The University of Texas at Arlington
Dr. Karabi C. Bezboruah

Dr. Karabi C. Bezboruah
Professor, Public Affairs and Planning
The University of Texas at Arlington

Building Adaptive Capacity to Address Coastal Flooding: The Case of a Small Texas City

Environmental Science & Policy (January 2024)

Karabi Bezboruah, Amruta Sakalker, Michelle Hummel, Oswald Jenewein, Kathryn Masten, Yonghe Liu, Building adaptive capacity to address coastal flooding: The case of a small Texas City, Environmental Science & Policy, Volume 151, 2024, 103599, ISSN 1462-9011,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2023.103599.

“Building Adaptive Capacity To Address Coastal Flooding: The Case Of A Small Texas City,” published in Environmental Science & Policy by Karabi Bezboruah, Professor at The University of Texas at Arlington, and colleagues, examines the pivotal role of community-based organizations (CBOs) in mitigating the effects of coastal flooding, with a focus on a small Texas community. The study, which was funded by an NSF grant, is set in the City of Ingleside on the Bay (IOB) and explores how the Ingleside on the Bay Coastal Watch Association (IOBCWA), a resident-led nonprofit, has enhanced the community’s resilience against coastal flooding. The research employs a participatory mixed-methods approach, combining grounded theory and the Regional Fingerprint tool, to analyze the environmental challenges faced by coastal communities and to evaluate their adaptive capacities.

This article is particularly relevant for nonprofit researchers, academics, and practitioners, as it underscores the importance of local knowledge, participatory governance, and the role of small, community-based nonprofits in environmental mitigation efforts. The study demonstrates how IOBCWA has improved IOB’s adaptive capacity through community organizing, advocacy, data collection, capacity building, and regional communication networks. The findings highlight the need for more formalized policies, enhanced regional partnerships, and broader inclusion of socially vulnerable groups in addressing environmental challenges. This research offers valuable insights into how local conditions shape adaptation strategies and provides tools for similar coastal communities facing climate impacts, emphasizing the significant role of small nonprofits in building community resilience.

Karabi Bezboruah, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Public Affairs and Planning at the College of Architecture, Planning and Public Affairs (CAPPA) at the University of Texas at Arlington.Dr. Bezboruah also serves as the director of the two doctoral programs in CAPPA. These are the Public Administration & Public Policy (PAPP), and Urban Planning and Public Policy (UPPP).

Dr. Bezboruah teaches administration and policy courses in the Department of Public Affairs. She teaches the core courses in the Nonprofit Management specialization track and facilitates the graduate Certificate in Urban Nonprofit Management. She applies service-learning pedagogy in her courses, and has worked with community organizations, nonprofits, and local government agencies.

Dr. Bezboruah’s research includes cross sector collaboration, nonprofit management and leadership, strategic management, community development, cross-sector comparisons, NGOs – organizational role, gender role, leadership role & NGO effectiveness. Her work is in the intersection between public policies and organizational behavior, and she frequently collaborates with other disciplines to conduct research on policy issues surrounding health, housing and the environment.

By |2023-12-07T08:22:43-05:00January 8th, 2024|NACC Member Research|

Amid ‘checkout charity’ boom, some Americans are more likely to be impulse givers than others

Dr. Ruth K. Hansen, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Dr. Ruth K. Hansen

Dr. Ruth K. Hansen
Assistant Professor, Nonprofit Management
Director, Institute for Nonprofit Management Studies
College of Business and Economics
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Amid ‘checkout charity’ boom, some Americans are more likely to be impulse givers than others
by Dr. Lauren Dula and Ruth K. Hansen | The Conversation, November 2023

In an enlightening article “Amid ‘checkout charity’ boom, some Americans are more likely to be impulse givers than others,” co-authored by Dr. Lauren Dula (Binghamton University) and Dr. Ruth K. Hansen, NACC Board Member and Assistant Professor of Nonprofit Management at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, the phenomenon of impulse giving at retail checkouts is explored in depth. Published on The Conversation, the article delves into the growing trend of checkout charity in the United States, where consumers are frequently asked to contribute to various causes such as Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, Boys and Girls Clubs of America, or relief efforts in Ukraine. The study highlights the significant impact of these campaigns, noting that in 2022, 77 businesses raised over $1 million each, totaling $749 million.

Dr. Hansen and Dr. Dula’s research, soon to be published in the Journal of Public and Nonprofit Affairs, involved a national survey of 1,383 American adults to understand the profile of an impulse giver – someone who donates on the spur of the moment during a retail transaction. Their findings revealed that more than half of the respondents had engaged in checkout charity, typically rounding up their purchase total. These impulse givers, predominantly under 50 years of age and from middle-class backgrounds, contribute about $50 annually through such acts of charity. Interestingly, the study found that women are more likely than men to participate in checkout charity, and Black respondents were found to give more on average than white respondents. However, despite this trend of generosity, the article raises concerns about potential donor fatigue, suggesting that the increasing frequency of checkout charity requests could lead to a decrease in impulse giving as customers grow more accustomed and possibly less responsive to these appeals.

Ruth K. Hansen, PhD, is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater’s College of Business and Economics, and director of the Institute for Nonprofit Management Studies. She teaches classes in nonprofit organizations, fundraising, organizational behavior, and research methods. Her research focuses on the theory and practice of fundraising, and equity and inclusion in resource mobilization. Dr. Hansen has more than 20 years’ professional experience as a fundraiser, and is a former board member of AFP-Chicago. Recent publications include “Applying a stakeholder management approach to ethics in charitable fundraising,” published in the Journal of Philanthropy and Marketing and “Gary Neighborhood House: Managing mission and uncertainty in the Civil Rights era,” in the edited volume Hoosier Philanthropy. She contributed the chapter “Theory in Fundraising,” to the new edition of Achieving Excellence in Fundraising, which was featured on Bill Stanczykiewicz’s First Day Podcast from The Fundraising School. Her research with Dr. Lauren Dula on fundraising appeal letters, supported by the AFP Foundation, is the subject of a recent article in Advancing Philanthropy.

By |2023-12-11T15:17:26-05:00December 11th, 2023|NACC Member Research|

Understanding Generosity: A Look at What Influences Volunteering and Giving in the United States

Dr. Nathan Dietz and Dr. Robert T. Grimm Jr., Do Good Institute
Dr. Nathan Dietz

Nathan Dietz
Associate Research Professor
Research Director, Do Good Institute
Director, Do Good Lab
School of Public Policy
University of Maryland

Dr. Robert T. Grimm Jr.

Robert T. Grimm, Jr.
Professor of the Practice
Levenson Family Chair in Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership
Director, Do Good Institute
School of Public Policy
University of Maryland

Understanding Generosity: A Look at What Influences Volunteering and Giving in the United States
Do Good Institute, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland (November 2023)

In the recent research report “Understanding Generosity: A Look at What Influences Volunteering and Giving in the United States,” authored by Nathan Dietz and Robert T. Grimm Jr. from the Do Good Institute at the University of Maryland, the decline in volunteering and charitable giving in the United States is meticulously analyzed. Funded by the Generosity Commission, this study is particularly insightful for nonprofit professionals as it examines both micro- and macro-level factors contributing to this downward trend. The report reveals a significant decrease in formal volunteer rates and charitable donations, a pattern that emerged before the COVID-19 pandemic and has continued since. The decline, which began in the early 2000s for donations and early 2010s for volunteering, is linked to various individual, family, and state-level characteristics.

Key micro-level factors identified include educational attainment, age, parenthood, gender, marital status, employment status, and living area. For instance, college graduates are more likely to volunteer, and giving rates increase with age. Surprisingly, those who are unemployed are more likely to volunteer than full-time workers, while rural residents are more likely to volunteer than their urban or suburban counterparts. The report emphasizes the role of nonprofits in understanding these trends to better target potential donors and volunteers. Macro-level factors, such as state poverty rates and the prevalence of nonprofits, also influence these behaviors, albeit to a lesser extent. For example, states with widespread poverty see higher rates of volunteering and giving. The findings challenge assumptions about the link between the prevalence of nonprofits and individual generosity, underscoring the need for more effective engagement strategies by these organizations. This research offers valuable insights into the dynamics of philanthropic behavior, crucial for shaping strategies to revitalize volunteerism and giving in the US.

Nathan Dietz, PhD, is an Associate Research Professor and the Research Director at the Do Good Institute, as well as the Director of the Do Good Lab at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. Joining in March 2017, Dietz brings over two decades of research experience in government, the nonprofit sector, and academia. His work primarily revolves around social capital, volunteering, charitable contributions, civic engagement, and social entrepreneurship. Dietz has authored numerous Institute research publications and peer-reviewed articles in notable journals. He also teaches State, Local and Nonprofit Financial Management and chairs the Faculty Diversity Committee at the School of Public Policy.

Before his current role, Dietz was a senior research associate at the Urban Institute’s Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy, leading various research and evaluation projects. His previous experience includes serving as a senior program manager at the Partnership for Public Service and as an associate director for research and evaluation at the Corporation for National and Community Service. Dietz’s academic journey includes appointments at American University and degrees from the University of Rochester and Northwestern University, where he earned his PhD in political science and a bachelor’s degree with a dual major in political science and mathematical methods in social sciences, respectively.

Robert T. Grimm Jr., PhD, is a Professor of the Practice and holds the Levenson Family Chair in Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. As the founding Director of the Do Good Institute, he leads efforts to inspire and empower individuals to make a positive impact. Under his leadership, the Institute has expanded significantly, offering numerous programs and courses that engage thousands of students annually in social change initiatives. The Do Good Institute’s impact was recognized with the 2021 Regents Award for Faculty Excellence in Public Service by the University of Maryland Board of Regents and the inaugural Voinovich Public Innovation Prize by NASPAA. Notably, Grimm’s involvement facilitated the growth of the Food Recovery Network and the launch of successful companies like Hungry Harvest and Imperfect Foods.

Dr. Grimm’s extensive experience in public service includes his roles at AmeriCorps as Senior Counselor to the CEO and Director of Research & Policy Development. He played a key role in the creation of President Obama’s Social Innovation Fund and significantly expanded AmeriCorps’s research funding. A recognized expert in philanthropy and civic engagement, Grimm’s research has been featured in prominent media outlets and academic journals. He also testified at the first hearing of the National Commission on Military, National and Public Service. An Iowa native, Grimm received his PhD from Indiana University, which honored him with its 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award.

By |2023-12-07T01:11:26-05:00December 7th, 2023|NACC Member Research|

Disciplining Generosity

Dr. Beth Breeze, Centre for Philanthropy, University of Kent
Dr. Beth Breeze with book, Advising Philanthropists

Dr. Beth Breeze
Director, Global Challenges Doctoral Centre
Director, Centre for Philanthropy
University of Kent

Disciplining Generosity
Stanford Social Innovation Review (2023)

In “Disciplining Generosity,” an excerpt from “Advising Philanthropists: Principles and Practice” by Beth Breeze, Director of the Centre for Philanthropy at the University of Kent, and her colleague Emma Beeston (Philanthropy Advisor), the role of philanthropy advisors in fostering effective and sustainable social innovation is explored. This article, particularly relevant to nonprofit researchers and practitioners, highlights the growing significance of these advisors in shaping philanthropic giving. The authors emphasize how philanthropy advisors, like those from the Bridgespan Group who guided MacKenzie Scott’s significant contributions, play a critical role in enhancing the impact of philanthropy. Through their 48 combined years of experience in fundraising, grant-making, and philanthropy advising, Beeston and Breeze draw on interviews with 40 advisors across 15 countries to shed light on the profession. Their work reveals how these advisors are integral in encouraging more and better philanthropic giving, which is essential for addressing social and environmental challenges.

The article delves into the complexities of the advisory role, discussing how advisors navigate ethical dilemmas and influence donors to make strategic and impactful contributions. Advisors not only guide donors in choosing effective organizations and projects but also challenge them to think critically about their giving practices. This includes addressing donors’ preconceptions, encouraging strategic collaboration, and promoting equitable and just philanthropic practices. By doing so, advisors play a pivotal role in mitigating social problems and enhancing the overall efficacy of philanthropic efforts. The article underscores the importance of this profession in the broader philanthropic ecosystem, stressing the need for advisors to balance client service with a commitment to broader societal good. It suggests that the future of effective philanthropy may well hinge on the skill and insight of these crucial advisors.

Beth Breeze is Director of the Centre for Philanthropy, which she co-founded in 2008. Beth began her career as a fundraiser for a youth homelessness charity and spent a decade working in a variety of fundraising, research, and charity management roles, including as deputy director at the Institute for Philanthropy. Motivated by the lack of substantive research underpinning practice, Beth completed a PhD on contemporary philanthropy at Kent in 2011 and has remained at the University ever since.

By |2023-12-07T00:28:27-05:00December 7th, 2023|NACC Member Research|

Fundraising Theory and Excellence

Dr. Ruth K. Hansen and Dr. Genevieve G. Shaker
Dr. Ruth K. Hansen

Dr. Ruth K. Hansen
Assistant Professor, Nonprofit Management
Director, Institute for Nonprofit Management Studies
College of Business and Economics
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Dr. Genevieve G. Shaker

Dr. Genevieve G. Shaker
Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies
Donald A. Campbell Chair in Fundraising Leadership
Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

 

Fundraising Theory and Excellence
Dr. Ruth K. Hansen and Dr. Genevieve G. Shaker

Theory in Fundraising, a book chapter by Dr. Ruth K. Hansen, NACC board member, Assistant Professor, and Director of the Institute for Nonprofit Management Studies, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, discusses how theory can help us better understand how and why fundraising happens. Featured in Achieving Excellence in Fundraising (5th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2022) and The Fundraising Reader (1st Edition, Routledge, 2023) the chapter introduces four theoretical frameworks used to explain aspects of fundraising, especially relating to donor relations and engagement. Fundraisers function as boundary spanners within open systems to acquire and maintain resources for their charities. Donated gifts often contain social elements of reciprocity, which must be negotiated. Donors often make gifts that are consistent with their own values and identities. By understanding donors’ expectations, fundraisers can increase the nonprofit’s perceived salience, legitimacy, and trustworthiness. Readers are encouraged to apply different theoretical lenses to their own practice to generate further insights.

Achieving Excellence in Fundraising, co-edited by Dr. Genevieve G. Shaker, NACC board member and Associate Professor, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, has long been the go-to reference for fundraising principles, concepts, and techniques. Topics include donor motivations and behaviors, engaging donors at all levels, inclusive and ethical fundraising, and more, with contributions from noted experts in the field. You’ll gain insight into the practice of fundraising and the fundraising cycle, reinforced by discussion questions, application exercises, and research-based recommendations.

This 5th edition of Achieving Excellence in Fundraising is reimagined to meet the needs of today’s fundraisers, their nonprofit employers, and the causes they serve, while maintaining key concepts that stand the test of time. Compelling and timely topics new to this edition include donor-advised funds, crowdfunding, raising money in challenging times, fundraising for social advocacy, and more. The needs of fundraising educators are also a central consideration in the book’s organization and contents.

Ruth K. Hansen, PhD, is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater’s College of Business and Economics, and director of the Institute for Nonprofit Management Studies. She teaches classes in nonprofit organizations, fundraising, organizational behavior, and research methods. Her research focuses on the theory and practice of fundraising, and equity and inclusion in resource mobilization. Dr. Hansen has more than 20 years’ professional experience as a fundraiser, and is a former board member of AFP-Chicago. Recent publications include “Applying a stakeholder management approach to ethics in charitable fundraising,” published in the Journal of Philanthropy and Marketing and “Gary Neighborhood House: Managing mission and uncertainty in the Civil Rights era,” in the edited volume Hoosier Philanthropy. She contributed the chapter “Theory in Fundraising,” to the new edition of Achieving Excellence in Fundraising, which was featured on Bill Stanczykiewicz’s First Day Podcast from The Fundraising School. Her research with Dr. Lauren Dula on fundraising appeal letters, supported by the AFP Foundation, is the subject of a recent article in Advancing Philanthropy.

Genevieve G. Shaker, PhD, is associate professor of philanthropic studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and adjunct professor of liberal arts and of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

She was an advancement officer for 20 years, most recently as associate dean for development and external affairs for the School of Liberal Arts, where she facilitated communications and marketing, alumni programming, and public events as well as fundraising, overseeing the school’s $20 million-dollar contribution to an overall $3.9 billion university-wide campaign.

Professor Shaker’s research focuses on fundraising and fundraisers, workplace philanthropy, philanthropy education, and higher education advancement—including faculty work and the public good as well as philanthropic practices within higher education. Her current projects include explorations of the fundraising profession, relationships between donors and fundraisers, studies intended to generate new information about workplace giving in the United States, and continued examination of how higher education contributes to the global common good.

By |2023-11-28T12:29:46-05:00November 28th, 2023|NACC Member Research|

2023 State of Nonprofits and Philanthropy Annual Report

Laura Deitrick, University of San Diego
Dr. Laura Deitrick, University of San Diego

Dr. Laura Deitrick
Interim Co-Executive Director, The Nonprofit Institute; Professor of Practice, Department of Leadership Studies; NLM Program Director, School of Leadership and Education Sciences
University of San Diego

2023 State of Nonprofits and Philanthropy Annual Report

Meschen, Connelly; Young, Emily; Tinkler, Tessa; Deitrick, Laura; and Durnford, Jon, “2023 State of Nonprofits and Philanthropy Annual Report” (2023). State of Nonprofits in San Diego. 20. https://digital.sandiego.edu/npi-stateofnp/20

San Diego County is home to a growing and dynamic nonprofit sector working on the frontlines to serve families and communities while also advancing innovative solutions to the region’s most urgent challenges. To support the community and regional leaders to be informed partners with the nonprofit sector, the 2023 State of Nonprofits and Philanthropy Annual Report provides relevant and current information on the health and impact of the sector. The report draws from over a decade of quarterly public opinion polling of San Diego residents and a survey of local nonprofit leaders, combined with the latest nonprofit data from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the California Employment Development Department (EDD). This year’s data document a thriving nonprofit sector that is very much in need of ongoing support to sustain and enhance its capacity to address the pressing problems facing the San Diego County region.

Dr. Laura Deitrick serves as the Director of the Nonprofit Leadership and Management graduate program and as the Associate Director of The Nonprofit Institute at the University of San Diego. She has been a nonprofit executive director, board member, management consultant, and researcher on major nonprofit trends. Her research has led to important reports on nonprofit ethics, nonprofits and public education, nonprofit human resource practices, executive transition, the economics of San Diego and California’s nonprofit sector, nonprofit public confidence, and regional grantmaking. She served as the principal investigator for Nonprofit Academy, an award-winning capacity building project co-created by the Nonprofit Institute and The City of San Diego.

Dr. Deitrick is a faculty member in the Department of Leadership Studies where she teaches nonprofit management, organizational theory, program design, and evaluation. In2021, she was recognized as the department’s outstanding faculty member. Since 2019, Dr. Deitrick has served on the board of directors for Barrio Logan College Institute (BLCI). She is also the co-author of Cases in Nonprofit Management: A Hands-on Approach to Problem Solving, published by Sage publications.

By |2023-11-21T15:41:55-05:00November 20th, 2023|NACC Member Research|

Developing Sustainability in Organizations: A Values-Based Approach

Dr. Marco Tavanti, University of San Francisco
Dr. Marco Tavanti, University of San Francisco

Dr. Marco Tavanti
Professor of Leadership
MNA Program Director

School of Management
University of San Francisco

Developing Sustainability in Organizations: A Values-Based Approach

Palgrave Macmillan Cham, 2023

This book explores the historical, foundational, and applied elements of sustainability theory and practice as relevant to the leadership, management, and innovation of organizations, companies, and enterprises. It provides analytical and critical reviews of the current evolution of sustainability for people, planet, prosperity, innovation, and impact.

Divided into four parts, the work offers an integrated model of development for creating and delivering sustainability values at the personal, organizational, societal, and environmental levels. The different sections examine sustainability leadership (focusing on of ethics, values, and purpose), sustainability management (focusing on organizational effectiveness and stakeholders’ wellbeing), sustainability innovation (focusing on social and environmental entrepreneurship), and sustainability impact (focusing on resilience, interconnectedness, consciousness, systemic thinking, and cosmic empathy for the common good and common future).

Combining theoretical and practical applications that give the reader a deeper, scientific, and critical understanding of the urgent, complex, and necessary values for a sustainable future for all, this comprehensive text is a must-read for researchers and students alike, providing a framework for effective globally responsible leadership.

Dr. Marco Tavanti is a sustainability and leadership international scholar whose experience stretches over 30 years and whose work has taken him to more than 18 countries in Europe, East Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Dr. Tavanti’s teaching in sustainable development, leadership ethics, intercultural diversity, and NGO management is grounded in Jesuit values and his scholarship is an embodiment of the University’s mission to be of service to humankind.

Dr. Tavanti is a systems thinker whose scholarship aims at providing practical and integrated solutions to issues in international development and poverty reduction. His research methods are participatory in nature and directed at building international capacity in leaders, organizations, and institutions. Through his teaching he inspires globally engaged leaders while building professional capacity through international managerial skills across sectors.

He is President of the Sustainable Capacity International Institute (SCII-ONLUS) and CEO of its subsidiary SDG.services. He is co-founder of the World Engagement Institute (WEI), an international organization providing capacity development services for sustainable human security. He designed and directed various professional training programs on sustainable community development, indigenous human rights, anti-human trafficking and refugee service management. He has been consulting and collaborating with United Nations agencies such as the Development Programme (UNDP), the Global Compact (UNGC), the Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Through his engagement with the UN Global Compact he contributed to the development of the Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

By |2023-11-20T12:32:53-05:00November 20th, 2023|NACC Member Research|
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