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NACC Members

NACC Membership

Nonprofit organizations and voluntary action are critical to the development and strengthening of democracy and civil society throughout the world. Universities are central institutions for understanding and promoting the structures essential for democratic life. University-based programs that perform research, teaching and public service to strengthen nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, philanthropy, and voluntary action are critical to helping universities and their communities meet this need.

NACC is pleased to acknowledge Sustaining Members of NACC who have made an additional investment in NACC to help ensure the vibrancy of this community of nonprofit academic centers serving for the public good.


NACC Members by University:

Academic Institution College, Department, Center, or Degree Program
Antioch University of Los Angeles MA in Nonprofit Management
Arizona State University ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation
Auburn University Bachelor of Science degree in Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies
Auburn University Master of Public Administration Program
Baruch College, CUNY Center for Nonprofit Strategy and Management
Bay Path University MS in Nonprofit Management and Philanthropy and MS in Strategic Fundraising and Philanthropy
Carleton University School of Public Policy and Administration
Case Western Reserve University Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences
Catholic University of Milan ALTIS Graduate School of Business & Society
Cass Business School, City University London Centre for Charity Effectiveness
DePaul University School of Public Service
George Mason University Center for Nonprofit Management, Philanthropy and Policy
Georgia Southern University Department of Public and Nonprofit Studies
Grand Valley State University Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy & School of Public, Nonprofit and Health Administration
Hamline University Master of Nonprofit Management, School of Business
Indiana University Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
John Carroll University Master of Arts in Nonprofit Administration
Lindenwood University Plaster School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Louisiana State University in Shreveport Institute for Nonprofit Administration and Research
Metropolitan State University College of Community Studies and Public Affairs
Murray State University Nonprofit Leadership Studies Program
National Research University Centre for Studies of Civil Society and the Nonprofit Sector
New York University School of Law National Center on Philanthropy and the Law
North Carolina State University Institute for Nonprofits
North Park University Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management
Northern Illinois University Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies
Queensland University of Technology Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies
Regis University Master of Nonprofit Management
Seattle University Nonprofit Leadership
Seton Hall University Master of Public Administration Program
Slippery Rock University Department of Philanthropy, Nonprofit Leadership and Public Affairs
Texas A&M University Center for Nonprofits and Philanthropy, Bush School of Government & Public Service
The New School MS in Nonprofit Management, Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment
University of Central Florida School of Public Administration
University of Connecticut Nonprofit Leadership Program, Department of Public Policy
University of Delaware Biden School of Public Policy and Administration, Center for Community Research & Service
University of Denver Master of Nonprofit Leadership
University of Kent (UK) Centre for Philanthropy
University of Maryland Do-Good Institute
University of Memphis Public and Nonprofit Administration
University of Missouri-Kansas City Midwest Center for Nonprofit Leadership, Department of Public Affairs, Henry W. Bloch School of Management
University of Missouri-St. Louis Nonprofit Management and Leadership Program
University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business
University of Oregon Master of Nonprofit Management, School of Planning, Public Policy, and Management
University of Richmond Master in Nonprofit Studies
University of San Diego The Nonprofit Institute, School of Leadership & Education Sciences
University of San Francisco Master of Nonprofit Administration, School of Management
University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy, Center on Philanthropy & Public Policy
University of Tampa Nonprofit Management, Sykes College of Business
University of Technology – Sydney Master of Not-for-Profit and Social Enterprise Management, UTS Business School
University of Texas at Arlington Bachelor of Arts in Philanthropy
University of Texas at Austin RGK Center for Philanthropy & Community Service, LBJ School of Public Affairs
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater College of Business & Economics
Virginia Tech Institute for Policy and Governance

NACC Affiliate Members:

Institution
Nonprofit Leadership Alliance

By |2021-09-20T18:27:57+00:00January 18th, 2019|

Membership Criteria and Process

NACC Membership

Nonprofit organizations and voluntary action are critical to the development and strengthening of democracy and civil society throughout the world. Universities are central institutions for understanding and promoting the structures essential for democratic life. University-based programs that perform research, teaching and public service to strengthen nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, philanthropy, and voluntary action are critical to helping universities and their communities meet this need.

The NACC Membership Model

NACC offers two main categories of membership:

  • General Membership: programs with an academic affiliation that can demonstrate a focus on at least two of the three programmatic areas outlined below (education, research and community).
  • Affiliate Membership: for organizations, entities, etc. that have an interest in affiliation with NACC that do not meet our criteria for full membership as part of accredited colleges or universities.

General Membership

  • To qualify for general membership, programs must meet minimum standards as defined by NACC.
  • New programs will be encouraged to apply by one of two annual deadlines, and applications will be reviewed twice a year.
  • The focus of membership will remain on programs with an academic affiliation that can demonstrate a focus on at least two of the three programmatic areas outlined below (education, research and community).

General Membership Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for general membership, the applicant must:

  1. Operate within an accredited college or university. If the program or center is located internationally, accreditation will be appropriate to the home institution.
  2. Have a primary focus on nonprofit, non-governmental sector management, or philanthropic studies (or related areas such as civil society, social economy, and social innovation).
  3. Provide evidence of ongoing activity in at least two of the three programmatic areas – education, research, and community engagement – as defined below.
  4. Demonstrate a substantial allocation of resources and programming to the programmatic area(s), including:
  • A designated faculty or staff position which has primary responsibility to direct programmatic activities. We recognize the title and exact scope and type of responsibilities may vary, and some responsibility can be shared among other faculty, staff, or students.
  • Accountability to and association with the academic division of the school, college, or university (which can include continuing or professional education), rather than some other area, such as student affairs.
  • Staff support for its activities. No minimum level of staffing is required.

General Membership Criteria & Process

Three programmatic areas form the foundation for the work of general NACC members – education, research, and community engagement:

  • Education: A systematic program of academic credit studies is a requirement of the education criterion. The program need not take the form of a full degree, but it should be of an academic credit-bearing nature, including concentrations or specializations within full degrees, or academic credit (as opposed to noncredit) certificate programs. If a center or program does not offer credit programs itself, its leadership or staff shall participate in teaching these offerings by other academic units affiliated with the center. Other forms of noncredit education, including professional seminars, workshops and continuing education noncredit certificates, can be important dimensions of a center’s educational programming and offer diverse learning opportunities, but a core of academic, credit-bearing offerings is essential.
  • Research: Some ongoing creation of publications by persons directly affiliated with the program is a requirement for the research criterion. We recognize that research in the field of nonprofit, nongovernmental, and philanthropic studies can take a wide variety of forms including: scholarship that yields books, articles, and papers in academic outlets; applied research of immediate application to practitioners in the field whether done under contract and/or disseminated in professional practice publications; knowledge-building that yields curriculum and instructional materials and publications; or different products from the “scholarship of engagement.” It also consists of disseminating the knowledge created through conferences, symposia, and seminars. All of these research and dissemination activities are valid and encouraged. However, among these activities we consider some on-going activity yielding scholarly and/or professional publications to be essential.
  • Community Engagement: The community engagement or service criterion is understood as academically-based activities that go beyond conventional faculty service assignments. This includes an ongoing and intentional program of engagement that attempts to provide direct impact in its nonprofit community to nonprofit organizations and the community at large. These should be substantial and a formal part of the program or center’s programming, and may include providing consulting, technical advice or assistance to nonprofit organizations, convenings or workshops, or participating in nonprofit public policy and advocacy activities, to name just a few examples.

Sustaining General Membership

In addition to general membership, NACC offers sustaining membership for our members that voluntarily make an additional investment in NACC to help ensure the vibrancy of this community of nonprofit academic centers serving for the public good.

APPLY FOR GENERAL MEMBERSHIP

Affiliate Membership

NACC offers Affiliate Membership to organizations and individuals who are not degree-conferring colleges or universities but who have a related interest in education, training, research or service to nonprofit, nongovernmental philanthropic organizations. This can include government agencies, foundations and other nonprofits, private firms, and individual consultants and trainers that provide non-credit bearing education, or support.

To be eligible for NACC Affiliate Membership, the applicant must:

  1. Support the mission of NACC as an association of academic degree programs at accredited colleges and universities.
  2. Demonstrate that a substantive part of their work contributes to developing any of the knowledge and skills covered by the NACC Curricular Guidelines.

Affiliate Membership is available at two levels: Partner and Sponsor.

Partner Affiliates benefits include:

  • Direct access to a network of top leaders from among the most prestigious and innovative programs, centers, and institutions focused on a shared commitment to philanthropic and nonprofit sector studies, research, and service.
  • The opportunity to have a voice in shaping nonprofit academic center resources (such as curricular guidelines and indicators of quality).
  • Meetings, forums, and conferences that blend hands-on field-building work and peer information exchange.
  • Visibility of each member center within the field and with the larger public.
  • Legitimacy with host academic institutions and local communities through association with a respected international organization.
  • Free advertising for job posting on the NACC website and in the NACC news.
  • Discounted registration fees for NACC conferences.

Sponsor Affiliates receive all the above benefits, along with additional benefits including:

  • Special designation on our website as a sponsor affiliate member
  • Recognition at all NACC meetings, conferences and other events thanking our sponsor affiliate members for their continued support. This includes on printed programs, schedules, presentations, etc.

APPLY FOR AFFILIATE MEMBERSHIP

Membership Fees

  • General Membership | $1,000 USD annually
  • General Sustaining Membership | $2,500 USD annually
  • Partner Affiliate Membership | $1,000 USD annually
  • Sponsor Affiliate Membership | $2,500 USD annually

Relationship to Accreditation

  • Membership and accreditation are distinct entities and processes. Membership in NACC does not equal accreditation in NACC.
  • NACC membership is required before a program can apply for accreditation.

You can learn more about the NACC Accreditation Process here.

By |2020-02-26T17:12:47+00:00January 18th, 2019|

Membership

NACC Membership

Nonprofit organizations and voluntary action are critical to the development and strengthening of democracy and civil society throughout the world. Universities are central institutions for understanding and promoting the structures essential for democratic life. University-based programs that perform research, teaching and public service to strengthen nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, philanthropy, and voluntary action are critical to helping universities and their communities meet this need.

The Nonprofit Academic Centers Council (NACC) was founded in 1991 by leaders of university-based nonprofit academic programs who wanted to share information and ideas to strengthen their programs and advance the field of philanthropic and nonprofit sector education within their institutions and beyond. Central to building the field is recognition and support by institutions of higher education that philanthropic and nonprofit sector studies are a vital component of the education, research and community engagement that they undertake. NACC member programs are committed to the advancement of nonprofit and philanthropic studies programs that are recognized by their host institutions as a focal point of nonprofit sector activity.

NACC’s newly revised criteria for membership maintain a commitment to the advancement of fully realized academic centers focused on the nonprofit sector while also recognizing the increasing diversity of programs and institutions both within and outside the academy that participate in our field.

Click here to view our NACC Members.

A Revised NACC Membership Model

In 2019 NACC’s members and board discussed membership for organizations interested in NACC membership, who do not meet all the current criteria for membership as members of accredited colleges or universities. At the 2019 membership meeting we voted to create affiliate membership for these types of organizations.

NACC offers two main categories of membership:

  • General Membership: programs with an academic affiliation that can demonstrate a focus on at least two of the three programmatic areas outlined below (education, research and community).
  • Affiliate Membership: for organizations, entities, etc. that have an interest in affiliation with NACC that do not meet our criteria for full membership as part of accredited colleges or universities.

Why Join NACC?

Member benefits include:

  • Direct access to a network of top leaders from among the most prestigious and innovative programs, centers, and institutions focused on a shared commitment to philanthropic and nonprofit sector studies, research, and service. NACC does not distribute email addresses for NACC members or those subscribing to its monthly email newsletter (NACC News). Members may request information be distributed to NACC News recipients or NACC member representatives.
  • The opportunity to have a voice in shaping nonprofit academic center resources (such as curricular guidelines and indicators of quality).
  • Meetings, forums, and conferences that blend hands-on field-building work and peer information exchange.
  • Visibility of each member center within the field and with the larger public.
  • Legitimacy with host academic institutions and local communities through association with a respected international organization.
  • Free advertising for job posting on the NACC website and in the NACC news. At this time, only NACC members may advertise job postings via these outreach mechanisms.
  • Discounted registration fees for NACC conferences.

Click here to apply for NACC membership.

Click here to pay your annual membership dues or your membership application fee.

Member Testimonials

“NACC is the forum that encourages me to think more deeply about teaching and research in our field. It is an essential reference point for understanding how we can better assist our students and strengthen the organizations they work in.”  — John Casey, Ph.D., Baruch College

“As we’ve grown our nonprofit programs to include a graduate certificate, an undergraduate minor, and a full master of nonprofit management, NACC has been our source for nonprofit-first curricular and administrative innovation.  The camaraderie among NACC members is both fun and valuable.” — Renee A. Irvin, Ph.D., University of Oregon

“NACC provides the space where we can think about collaboration and social capital as solely nonprofit studies concepts.” — Stuart C. Mendel, Ph.D., NACC Fellow

“NACC is the rudder that keeps me mindful of the field we love so dearly. Besides, I truly enjoy the professional people who represent the institutional members.” — J. Patrick Murphy, Ph.D., DePaul University

“NACC provides an instant network of people with similar concerns and issues; I have learned more from interacting with people in the NACC network than I have from any other source.” — Robert Donmoyer, Ph.D., The University of San Diego

“NACC helps me find best practices in the field of nonprofit education. I can see what courses make up a relevant program that will be attractive and helpful to students.” — Theresa Ricke-Kiely, Ed.D., University of Notre Dame

By |2020-01-30T21:16:40+00:00January 18th, 2019|

2017 NACC Biennial Conference and Member Meeting

Hosted by:

Registration for the conference is now closed. If you still need to pay your registration fee, you can do so here: http://bit.ly/2p2j863. Please contact Erin Vokes, Managing Director of NACC, at e.vokes@csuohio.edu if you have any questions.

Registrants: Access the 2017 Conference Materials Here


Dates: Monday, July 31—Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Schedule Overview:
Monday, 7/31: NACC Member Meeting, 12 pm to 5 pm (reception to follow)
Tuesday, 8/1: Biennial Conference Day 1, 8 am to 5 pm (reception to follow)
Wednesday, 8/2: Biennial Conference Day 2, 8 am to 1:30 pm

Location: JW Marriott Indianapolis, 10 S West Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204 and Indiana University, University Hall, Suite 3000, 301 University Blvd, Indianapolis, IN 46202

Lodging: JW Marriott Indianapolis, 10 S West Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204. The JW Marriott has offered us a special group rate of $199 USD per night. Book your room here:  Group rate for IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy – NACC at the JW Marriott Indianapolis. The last day to reserve your room at this rate is July 14, 2017.

Registration Fees: Discounted registration rates are available for NACC members and to graduate students of NACC member universities:
$125 for NACC members
$150 for non-NACC-members
$75 for students of NACC member organizations
$100 for students of non-NACC-member organizations

NACC 2017 Biennial Conference Overview

The NACC Biennial conference brings together academics, scholars, practitioners, and administrators from around the world to discuss, learn, and share tactics and methods that support and build university-based educational programs focused on nonprofit and philanthropic studies.  Topics for conversation include instruction, pedagogy, research, and substantive issues in education and administration. NACC invites papers from interested member institutions, their faculty affiliates, graduate students, and other members of the nonprofit community. Proposals will be considered by a review committee, and final manuscripts must be of scholarly quality.

View the Call for Proposals here. Papers on advances in nonprofit pedagogy, research, and service are encouraged. Papers pertaining to the conference theme, “Nonprofit and Philanthropy Parables and Cases: What We Learn from the Stories We Tell,” are also welcomed.

**We are seeking sponsors for the 2017 NACC Conference. View the Call for Sponsors. Interested individuals should contact Erin Vokes at e.vokes@csuohio.edu.**

Thank you very much to those who have already sponsored the conference:

PLATINUM SPONSORS
Host Sponsor & Tuesday Evening Reception Sponsor –
Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy 

Sponsor Cost: $5,000

Monday Evening Reception Sponsor –
University of Notre Dame, Mendoza College of Business

Sponsor Cost: $5,000

GOLD SPONSORS
NACC Member Meeting Sponsor —
Cleveland State University, Levin College of Urban Affairs

Sponsor Cost: $2,500

Technology Sponsor –
University of San Francisco, School of Management 

Sponsor Cost: $2,500

General Support –
Auburn University, Department of Political Science

Sponsor Cost: $2,500

SILVER SPONSORS
General Support —
Texas A&M University, Bush School of Government & Public Service

Sponsor Cost: $1,000

BRONZE SPONSORS
General Support –
Helen Bader Institute for Nonprofit Management, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Sponsor Cost: $750

General Support –
Seton Hall University, Center for Public Service

Sponsor Cost: $750

General Support –
University of Oregon, Department of Planning, Public Policy, & Management

Sponsor Cost: $500

General Support –
Arizona State University, Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation 

Sponsor Cost: $500

General Support –
North Park University, Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management

Sponsor Cost: $500

NACC would also like to recognize our Sustaining Members: 

  • Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • University of Oregon, Department of Planning, Public Policy, & Management

If you are interested in providing a sponsorship, please contact Erin Vokes at e.vokes@csuohio.edu.

Thanks and we look forward to seeing you this summer!

By |2019-01-20T21:10:02+00:00July 31st, 2017|Events|

Accreditation

NACC Accreditation Process

NACC Accreditation fosters third sector academic programs worldwide, including nonprofit and nongovernmental studies and management, social entrepreneurship, social-purpose organizations leadership, and philanthropy studies and management, all with curriculum that places the civil sector at the center of the curricular perspective.

OVERVIEW

The NACC Accreditation Process fosters third sector academic programs world-wide, including nonprofit and NGO studies and management, social entrepreneurship, social-purpose organizations leadership, and philanthropy studies and management, all with curriculum which places the civil sector at the center of the curricular perspective.

The value to both existing and emerging third sector, nongovernmental, and related degree programs is that accreditation serves as a signal to prospective students and prospective faculty that a university has a well-developed program, while providing a brighter line than just guidelines in constructing a curriculum that specifically addresses our distinctive sector.

For a comprehensive understanding of the NACC Accreditation Process, please view the available resources and links found in the sidebar of this webpage.

Please review all of the information below before you apply for Accreditation.


FRAMING CONCEPTS FOR THE NACC ACCREDITATION PROCESS

NACC Accreditation will launch with the idea that a critical mass of dedicated research, instruction, and experience has reached sufficient density to underpin nonprofit and philanthropy centered academic programs and their curriculum. Evidence of this is found in the growing number of stand-alone nonprofit and philanthropy studies credit bearing degree programs offered by NACC member institutions and others.

The legitimacy of nonprofit/philanthropy-first epistemology arises with the processes and outcomes followed in the creation and content of the successive iterations of NACC Curricular Guidelines.

The term “Accreditation” is used as a nod to the current practices of the profession of higher education. It is meant as the process of identifying how a particular academic program aligns with the best thinking of our day, as reflected in the NACC Curricular Guidelines and Indicators of Quality Institutions. It is our goal and hope that this process remains focused on ensuring “truth in advertising” and while also serving as an ongoing forum for innovations in nonprofit/philanthropy learning.

Among the principles contributing to the ethos and spirit of the organizers of the NACC Curricular Guidelines that we are applying to the NACC Accreditation process are as follows:

  • A nonprofit/philanthropy-first philosophy and perspective. A nonprofit/philanthropy-first approach refers to research centered on the unique role and nature of the nonprofit and philanthropy sector institutions in civil society.
  • Affirmation by academic program leaders and participants in this accreditation process that the pedagogical subject matter in the major subject headers of the NACC Curricular Guidelines reflect the distinctive and autonomous character of the nonprofit and philanthropy sector institution forms from those of business and government. Also that the themes of volunteerism governance; mission fulfillment; advocacy, intermediation and facilitation in society; partnership; social enterprise and others are interwoven in the subject areas.
  • A broader-than-management nonprofit studies pedagogy. The criteria for program review and assessment will be full stand-alone degree programs utilizing terminology that synchronizes with the nomenclature and themes found in the NACC Curricular Guidelines.

This project will trend for the simplest and most transparent analytical tools and logics to validate a nonprofit/philanthropy first academic program’s alignment with the NACC Curricular Guidelines. The approach will also use as guiding principles the following perspectives:

  • Take a reactive review standard rather than proscriptive to participating institutions seeking the imprimatur of the NACC;
  • Favor a consensus, non-confrontational process and outcome;
  • Endeavor to offer transparency in methods and in reporting of outcomes;
  • Provide opportunity and weight to participant context and explanation within the limits of brevity and clarity;
  • Validate a “truth in advertising” that academic programs accredited through the NACC process meet the criteria for content and quality framed by the NACC Curricular Guidelines.

NACC ACCREDITED PROGRAMS:

2020-2026

PILOT YEAR ONE, 2019-2025


BEFORE YOU APPLY

The Initial NACC Accreditation Application (Section 1: Intent to Undergo Accreditation) is now available. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, with the goal of completing the application process six months from the initial application being received.

We are excited to have you and your program move forward toward NACC Accreditation. We have designed the application process and portal so that it is easy and straightforward.

Before you initiate the application process, please review all of the information on this webpage and then we collect some key documents (PDFs) or web links ahead of time. This will save time as you are going through the application process. These documents are:

  • CV/Qualifications of professors who taught in the program over the last 2 years.
  • Curriculum plans, program guides, and/or course catalogues for the program to be accredited.
  • Syllabi and/or course summaries for all nonprofit classes taught in the program over the last 2 years.

In addition, we recommend you review the NACC Curricular Guidelines in advance as you will later be asked to “map” your curriculum according to these guidelines. Additional details about “curriculum mapping” can be found below.

An organization must be a member of NACC in order to undergo accreditation. If you are not yet a member of NACC but would like to become accredited, please visit our NACC Membership page to learn more about becoming a NACC member.


APPLICATION PROCESS OVERVIEW

The Initial NACC Accreditation Application (Section 1: Intent to Undergo Accreditation) is now available. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, with the goal of completing the accreditation process six months after the initial application is received.

The application contains three sections:

  • Section 1: Initial Application: Intent to Undergo Accreditation. This is a very brief electronic application that provides us with some basic information and informs us that you wish to undergo accreditation. The application fee is due at this time.
  • Section 2: Phone Interview. Once your initial application and proof of payment is received, the NACC Accreditation Team will contact you to schedule a phone interview to complete the second section of the application. Data based on your responses to our questions will be input by the Accreditation Launch Director and the Accreditation Coordinator. You should plan to spend an hour or so with us at that time. Additional information will be provided in advance of your interview.
  • Section 3: Curricular Guideline Mapping and Program Distinctiveness. In this section, you will “map” how your program’s curriculum aligns with the NACC Curricular Guidelines. It is neither mandatory nor expected that your curriculum meets every guideline. Additional information will be provided before you begin this section, and an overview about both components can be found below.

You can save your work and return to the electronic applications at any time.

If you need to submit electronic files, please email your PDFs to Nicole Collier at nicole.e.collier@tamu.edu.

Upon completion of all three sections of the application, including submission of payment, your application materials will be reviewed by separate External Review Board members trained to confirm the data made by the submitting institutions and to map the curriculum using the framework established in the NACC Curricular Guidelines.

Applications will be assessed on a first-come, first-served basis, based on when application fees are submitted and received. Graduate programs will be assessed, followed by undergraduate programs.

See the Accreditation Process Timeline below and in the resources in the sidebar of this webpage for specific details about the step-by-step timeframe, deadlines, and projected decision announcement date.


APPLY FOR ACCREDITATION

The Initial NACC Accreditation Application (Section 1: Intent to Undergo Accreditation) is now available.

Please read all of the information on this webpage before you apply. Then, to begin the application process, please complete Section 1 of the NACC Accreditation Application, Initial Application: Intent to Undergo Accreditation, available below. This is a very brief electronic application that provides us with some basic information and informs us that you wish to undergo accreditation in 2019. The application fee is due at the time you submit your initial application.

Click here to apply: Graduate Program Application | Undergraduate Program Application

An organization must be a member of NACC in order to undergo accreditation. If you are not yet a member of NACC but would like to become accredited, please visit our NACC Membership page to learn more about becoming a NACC member.


MODEL ACCREDITATION PROCESS TIMELINE:

The following dates are tentative projections for illustrative purposes. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

  • January 31: Initial Application and application fee received.*
  • January 31 to February 28: Interviews (Section 2) completed. Section 3 made available to the applicant immediately following completion of the interview.
  • February 29: Deadline to submit Section 3. This concludes the application process.
  • March 15: Accreditation Team to provide Preliminary Reports to ERB for their review and approval.
  • March 30: Preliminary Reports sent to respective Applicants for their review and response.
  • April 15: Deadline for Applicant to submit a response to the Preliminary Report to Accreditation Team.
  • June 1: Accreditation Team announces ERB’s final decisions to respective Applicants.
  • June 30: Hard copy reports sent to participating Institutions
  • August 30: Accreditation Team produces Accreditation Briefing report based on Accreditation findings.

CURRICULUM MAPPING

Part of the NACC Accreditation Process involves an exercise in “Curriculum Mapping,” in which programs are “mapped”* according to the NACC Curricular Guidelines. The Curricular Guidelines list 16 different broad topic areas for Graduate Programs and 13 different broad topic areas for Undergraduate Programs. Each broad topic area includes subtopics.

Kindly examine the respective Curricular Guidelines prior to starting the electronic input process. It is important to recognize that not all programs cover all Curricular Guideline topics.

*The following concept of Curriculum Mapping is applied by NACC when reviewing applications:

“The Glossary of Education Reform (n.d.) is a comprehensive online resource describing ‘widely used school-improvement terms, concepts, and strategies’ (para. 2) that was organized by the Great Schools Partnership. This glossary defines curriculum mapping as:

the process indexing or diagraming a curriculum to identify and address academic gaps, redundancies, and misalignments for purposes of improving the overall coherence of a course of study and, by extension, its effectiveness (a curriculum, in the sense that the term is typically used by educators, encompasses everything that teachers teach to students in a school or course, including the instructional materials and techniques they use). (“Curriculum Mapping,” 2013, para. 1).” (Carpenter, 2017)

There are four specific ways that programs can document that they are meeting the NACC Curricular Guidelines. This exercise will apply the mapping curriculum method in the manner listed below.

Program Meets a Curricular Guideline at the Core or Mission Level

Programs can show they are meeting a specific Curricular Guideline by linking it to their program’s mission statement or its general student learning outcomes. These are the “broadest” level of what it is that the program proposes to teach all students.

Since NACC does not expect that all programs will satisfy all Curricular Guidelines or even address all of them at this level, programs should instead pick the Curricular Guidelines that they believe are at the fundamental core of what all students in your program should be learning.

Program Meets a Curricular Guideline at the Course Level

Programs can show that they meet a specific Curricular Guideline through the general content of a specific course. For example, individual courses will often contain overall course objectives and/or course goals. These course objectives and goals are evidence that the course content addresses a specific Curricular Guideline.

Program Meets a Curricular Guideline at the Specific Course Assignment Level

Programs can also document that they address a specific Curricular Guideline by linking the specific Curricular Guideline to individual course assignments. Please make sure that reviewers know which course the specific assignment is attached to when describing it.

Program Meets a Curricular Guideline “Outside” the Classroom

While the primary mechanism for programs to show that they are meeting a Curricular Guideline is through the curriculum, it is also possible that programs can use extra-curricular activities as evidence they are meeting a specific Curricular Guideline. For example:

  • A program-sponsored fundraising or philanthropic giving contest could be used as evidence that the program is addressing the Fundraising and Resource DevelopmentCurricular Guideline;
  • A program-sponsored Nonprofit Organization Hackathon could be evidence that the program is addressing the Information Technology, Social Media, and Data Management Curricular Guideline;
  • A program-sponsored fundraising or philanthropic giving contest could be used as evidence that the program is addressing the Nonprofit Finance and FundraisingCurricular Guideline.

Carpenter, H. L. (2017). Curriculum Mapping Models and Other Processes that Might Work for Nonprofit and Philanthropy Accreditation. Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, 7(SI1), 111-117.


PROGRAM DISTINCTIVENESS

Part of NACC’s mission is to help build the nonprofit/philanthropy field. One way of doing that is by capturing and sharing broadly the distinctiveness and the accomplishments of academic programs and centers.

Since the goal of NACC accreditation is to offer a “mark of quality,” for academic programs, we believe that quality programs should be able to articulate ways that they are innovative, creative, distinct, or special in comparisons to other programs.

All programs have specialties or areas where they are particularly innovative, creative, distinct, and special. For some programs, this is cutting-edge research from faculty. For some programs, this is a strong community service program designed to improve local nonprofit capacity. For some programs, it is creative course structures or course content.

In the final section, we ask program identify and articulate three specific ways they see themselves as innovative, creative, distinct, and special. NACC is agnostic to what those three areas or topics are. All we ask is that programs make a good faith effort to identify, articulate, and report three distinctive characteristics of their program so that other programs can learn from these methods and processes.


DATA USAGE POLICY

Since we are considering this accreditation process as a pathway to learn from one another, we will consider the information we collect and the knowledge we create as the intellectual property of the NACC.

Consequently, we seek your affirmed permission to use the data and assessment outcomes we collect for purposes of further research questions and potentially for publication in report formats to our members; to the larger community of academics through the NACC News; at academic conferences affiliated with the field; and potentially in juried scholarly publications of the field. If you decline this permission, we require a statement from you clearly indicating your desire. We will consider the absence of a statement as consent to proceed as described.


APPEALS PROCESS

While our desire is to reach consensus with the participating organizations, and while checks and balances are in place to strive for fairness and impartiality, we will establish that appeal of the accreditation determination may be necessary and can be made through written articulation of the issue to the project director, and for subsequent review by the Accreditation Advisory Committee Chair.


FEE SCHEDULE & PAYMENT INFORMATION

The application fee is due at the time your Initial Application (Section 1: Intent to Undergo Accreditation) is submitted. Your initial application is not complete until payment is submitted.

Fees and Discounts:

$2,400 – Graduate Degree Program application fee (for one stand-alone nonprofit degree program)
$2,400 – Undergraduate Degree Program application fee (for one stand-alone nonprofit degree program)
$4,000 – Graduate & Undergraduate dual program application fee (with the $800 discount applied)*
$400 – Fee for late submission of Initial Application and/or application fee payment

Payment Instructions:

Checks made payable to Texas A&M University. Mailable to:

Texas A&M University
Attn: Dr. William Brown, NACC Accreditation
The Bush School
Allen Building 1051
4220 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-4200

Credit card payments can be processed here. Please retain a copy of the receipt.

By |2020-12-16T18:57:09+00:00January 18th, 2019|

NACC Black Lives Matter Statement

NACC Black Lives Matter Statement

The recent murders of African-Americans at the hands of the police and others in the USA have yet again brought the issue of race relations and the long history of injustice to the fore. If anything good is to come of this, we – as individuals and as an organization – must take this opportunity to reflect on where we stand and what we can do to address racism, bias and inequities.

NACC, an international membership association of academic centers, urges all members in the USA and elsewhere to use the months and years ahead to investigate our research and teaching to better understand where our biases are and where we have failed. The nonprofit organizations we serve and study are critical to the development and strengthening of democracy and civil society. Universities are central institutions for understanding and promoting the structures essential for democratic life. However, universities and the sector mirror society and contain the same endemic inequities. Our research continues to emphasize white, male philanthropy.

NACC itself has a decidedly mixed record. We only have to look at our membership and at the attendees at our meetings and conferences to see the evident truth. We are overwhelmingly white. We are primarily female. Almost exclusively, white males hold the senior positions in our own organization and in our member organizations.

One “excuse” we use is that we reflect the biases and inequities of the field we work in. We cannot hide behind that anymore. Another “excuse” is that we are going through a generational change, as the newer generation of emerging leaders better reflects the wide range of our society. If that is true, how can we push that change to occur faster?

As an organization, we commit to incorporating new content into the NACC Curricular Guidelines that will help nonprofit academic programs institute anti-racist curricula on their campuses.  We must remember that our students look to us for guidance on how to make the world a better place. The world is calling our graduates to fix the systemic problem of racism with protest, policy, programming, and with compassion.

But it’s not just about the curriculum content we recommend to member colleges and universities ; it’s about faculty members, administrators, and NACC itself. We commit to being an anti-racist organization. Over the last year, the NACC board went through a much-needed inclusion and diversity training. From this we created a series of working groups for improving NACC. These working groups have defined a number of important objectives including: revamping our communications to ensure greater participation by all members; instituting a new system of committee and board member recruitment that pushes us to incorporate a more diverse leadership; and, establishing a bias check function for our meetings and conferences.

The horrific incidents in Minnesota and elsewhere have placed an even greater sense of urgency on NACC to implement these and other improvements. Like many institutions in academia, NACC is a work in progress and there is much work to be done.

We welcome your suggestions and experiences in this journey forward.

Yours in solidarity,

The Nonprofit Academic Centers Council Board of Directors

By |2021-01-04T22:13:11+00:00January 4th, 2021|

Accreditation Timeline

NACC Accreditation Process

NACC Accreditation fosters third sector academic programs worldwide, including nonprofit and nongovernmental studies and management, social entrepreneurship, social-purpose organizations leadership, and philanthropy studies and management, all with curriculum that places the civil sector at the center of the curricular perspective.

Accreditation Timeline

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The following timeline is for illustrative purposes only.

  • January 31: Suggested deadline to submit Initial application and application fee.
  • January 31 to February 28: Interviews (Section 2) completed. Section 3 made available to applicant immediately following completion of interview.
  • February 29: Deadline to submit Section 3. This concludes the application process.
  • March 15: Accreditation Team to provides Preliminary Reports to ERB for their review and approval.
  • March 30: Preliminary Reports sent to respective Applicants for their review and response.
  • April 15: Deadline for Applicant to submit response to Preliminary Report to Accreditation Team.
  • June 1: Accreditation Team announces ERB’s final decisions to respective Applicants.
  • June 30: Hard copy reports sent to participating Institutions
  • August 30: Accreditation Team produces Health of the Field report based on Accreditation findings.

By |2020-12-16T19:06:24+00:00June 21st, 2019|

NACC News: March 2019

READ THE FULL ISSUE HERE

In this issue

  • Once Upon a Time…. | Elizabeth Boris  | Data Collection, Form 990, Discussion and Collaboration
  • Message From the President | Matt Hale
  • Greetings From the Executive Director | Erin Vokes
  • On My Mind | Patsy Kraeger |Trust in Institutions
  • Board Perspective | Angela Logan | Another Look at the Administration vs. Research Conundrum
  • Accreditation Report | Stuart Mendel
  • NACC 2019 Biennial Conference
  • Nu Lambda Mu
    • Emily Johnson | Hamline University
    • Kimberly Stuart | University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
  • Membership News
    • University of Southern California | Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy
    • Arizona State University | Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation
    • University of Central Florida | Center for Public and Nonprofit Management
    • Indiana University  | Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
    • Lindenwood University | Nonprofit Administration Program
    • Denver University \ Welcome a New Member

Continue Reading »

By |2019-05-21T14:10:00+00:00May 21st, 2019|News|

Curricular Guidelines

The NACC Curricular Guidelines

NACC Curricular Guidelines provide model curriculum for degrees in nonprofit leadership, nonprofit organization management, nonprofit sector studies and philanthropy.

View the Curricular Guidelines

Third Revised Edition 2015
(Graduate guidelines)

Second Revised Edition 2015
(Undergraduate guidelines)

NACC Curricular Guidelines, Fourth Revised Edition – Coming Soon!

As the fast-evolving field of nonprofit and philanthropy pedagogy deepens and the institutional delivery knowledge diversifies, our vision is that the academy and the field of nonprofit sector practice will innovate using the curricular topics and framework provided in the NACC Curricular Guidelines.

In reflecting on NACC’s dual mission of serving its members and advancing the field, it is clear to the organization’s leadership that the value of the curricular guidelines is indisputable; the need to update the documents, and revise them is essential as the fields of study continue to evolve. To that end, NACC is once again embarking on a “Curriculum Revision Project,” with Robert Ashcraft of Arizona State University spearheading the effort. As with past efforts in revising the guidelines, this Fourth Revised Edition (Graduate guidelines) and Third Revised Edition (Undergraduate guidelines) will utilize a crowd-source process. Guided by the NACC Board of Directors, widespread input will be sought from informed academics and practitioners through a web-platform and survey.

A Recent History of the Revised Guidelines

The formal study of the nonprofit sector, philanthropy, private organizations of civil society and the institutions of voluntarism around the globe has surpassed its fifth decade. Throughout these years, the steady march toward an independent field of pedagogy has given us a string of important benchmarks.

These include the founding of NACC in the early 1990s, and NACC’s creation of the original set of curricular guidelines for graduate and undergraduate study in nonprofit leadership, the nonprofit sector and philanthropy.

Building upon the work of the early and middle 2000s, input for these guidelines included the NACC constellation of institutional members, but also involved input from a much broader community of theory and practice experts. This third revision of the graduate curricular guidelines and this second revision of the undergraduate curricular guidelines reflect the cumulative pedagogy of formal and informal learning contributed by our members and the larger sphere of nonprofit sector stakeholders.

Among the salient changes in both the graduate and undergraduate guidelines are topical categories involving the expansion of technology in the field and in course delivery, more pronounced global and international perspectives, an accentuation of social innovation and social enterprise content areas, to name a few.

As the fast evolving field of nonprofit and philanthropy pedagogy deepens and the institutional delivery knowledge diversifies, our vision is that the academy and the field of nonprofit sector practice will innovate using the curricular topics and framework provided in these guidelines. From the benefit of experience drawn from multiple iterations of NACC’s curricular guidelines, we urge users in the U.S. and around the world, to approach these revisions as guidelines to help in the development of courses, programs and degrees.

Clearly, for those of us who study, teach, perform research and work in the nonprofit sector, the benchmarks offer indication that the time for a “nonprofit/philanthropy first” perspective of the discipline is upon us. To that end, we hope you will find the guidelines useful in your work. Please continue to assist us through broad dissemination of these guidelines and by helping to inform future guidelines. We anticipate more frequent revisions of these guidelines made possible through real-time opportunities to share your recommendations through a NACC web portal developed for such a purpose.

The Origins of NACC’s Curricular Guidelines Initiative

NACC is a membership association comprised of academic centers and/or programs at accredited colleges and universities that are devoted to the study of the nonprofit/nongovernmental sector, philanthropy and voluntary action to advance education, research, and practice that increase the nonprofit sector’s ability to enhance civic engagement, democracy, and human welfare. Given its mission, it is appropriate that NACC’s leaders have continued to advance comprehensive curricular guidelines to assist its members and build the field.

NACC’s leadership in developing and disseminating curricular guidelines began in 2001, made possible thanks to the generous financial support of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. As a result of extensive discussions from a variety of scholars and practitioners, led by a NACC appointed task force, the first-ever graduate guidelines were released in 2003. The initial graduate guidelines were immediately well received and prompted a call for NACC to continue evolving such guidelines to include not only subsequent revisions of the graduate document, but also for the development of undergraduate guidelines. Again, a task force was appointed and, in 2007, the second edition of the graduate guidelines and the first edition of undergraduate guidelines were released. As before, the documents were well received and their release coincided with the continued explosive growth of nonprofit education programs around the United States and across the world.

In evaluating NACC’s dual mission of serving its members and advancing the field(s) it was clear to the organization’s leadership in 2013–2104, that the value of the curricular guidelines is indisputable; the need to update the documents, and revise them is essential as the fields of study continue to evolve. To that end, NACC’s board authorized a “Curriculum Revision Project” and Robert Ashcraft of Arizona State University, was recruited to chair the effort. Unlike prior methods used for developing and revising the guidelines, involving a defined task force assembled for such purposes, this most recent effort utilized a crowd-source process. Guided by the NACC Board of Directors, widespread input was sought from informed academics and practitioners through a web-platform and survey, launched in August 2014. In edition, input was solicited through special NACC sessions established at the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA, arnova.org) and the International Society for Third-Sector Research (ISTR, istr.org) conferences held during the 2013 and 2014 years, respectively. Following a vetting and review process, NACC’s board adopted the revised guidelines at its board meeting in June 2015.

Since its beginning in 1991, NACC remains steadfast in its support of centers and programs that provide education and research about, and academically based services for, the nonprofit/nongovernmental sector and philanthropy. NACC’s desire is for these curricular guidelines to be actively used as academic programs continue to evolve.

Want to know more about the revision process? Reach out to Nicole Collier, Executive Director at nicole.e.collier@tamu.edu

By |2021-04-20T21:31:55+00:00January 20th, 2019|

Publication Opportunities

Publication Opportunities

As a benefit to members, NACC posts Calls for Papers and other publication opportunities. Links stay active for 30 days at which point they will be removed. Members can resubmit postings upon expiration of the 30-day period. Please note that the date the call is posted refers to the date the call was added to the Publication Opportunities webpage.

NACC News

If you have a story to share for inclusion in a monthly publication of NACC News, please send your article to our Editor, Linda Serra, at lindalserra@gmail.com.

View NACC News here.


Journal of Nonprofit Education & Leadership (JNEL)

NACC is proud to endorse our partner journal, the Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership. This quarterly journal’s mission is to improve nonprofit education and leadership through the publication and dissemination of peer-reviewed manuscripts centered on professional practice, research, and theoretical discussions. Manuscript submissions are encouraged from authors inside and outside of academia.

The Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership publishes quality manuscripts to disseminate the latest knowledge related to nonprofit education and leadership to help develop theory and practice. The journal seeks quantitative and/or qualitative research findings; conceptual or theoretical discussions; or program best practices.

Relevant topic areas (centered on nonprofit education and leadership) for the journal include, but are not limited to: nonprofit governance, fundraising, volunteer management, operations, legal framework, philanthropy, program planning, implementation and evaluation, and financial management.

The journal provides a forum for authors interested in nonprofit education and nonprofit leadership to exchange information via quality, peer-reviewed articles. This exchange is designed to advance theory and improve practice.

Learn more about the journal and publication opportunities here:
https://js.sagamorepub.com/jnel


Nonprofit Policy Forum (NPF)

Call for Papers 2018
Nonprofit Policy Forum is a double-blind refereed international journal that publishes original research and analysis on public policy issues and the public policy process critical to the work of nonprofit organizations and social enterprises. It serves as a forum and authoritative and accessible source of information, for scholars, leaders, and policy-makers worldwide. A primary goal of NPF is to provide nonprofit and social enterprise leaders and policy-makers with readily accessible and relevant scholarly research. NPF seeks to contribute to the development of the field of nonprofit related policy research, to more clearly define the role of the sector in the policy and advocacy process, and to build a stronger research base on public policy and nonprofit and social enterprise organizations. NPFis published by De Gruyter, Inc. and is in its 9th year of publication. The journal is published in Open Access format and is fully available at www.degruyter.com/loi/npf. Open Access is made possible through a grant from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundations and the institutional sponsors of NPF: The Humphrey School of the University of Minnesota, The Urban Institute, the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA) and the Stockholm Center for Civil Society Studies. NPF’s editorial board consists of leading scholars from 20 different countries in Europe, Asia, North America, and Australia.

NPF welcomes unsolicited manuscripts year-round. The journal strives for quality, relevance, and originality, and encourages contributions from all scholarly disciplines and all parts of the world. Articles should be written in English for a general audience, not a particular discipline. Content should address policy issues affecting nonprofit organizations and social enterprises in general or in particular subfields, the involvement of nonprofits in the policy process, the historical development of nonprofit-related policy issues, or analysis of policy proposals and alternatives affecting nonprofit organizations and social enterprises and the fields in which they are active.

Subject areas include but are not limited to analysis and evaluation of tax policies, regulatory policies, national security policy and civil liberties, policy advocacy and lobbying, government funding of nonprofit organizations, the role of faith-based institutions in service delivery, church and state relations, disaster relief policy, the role of nonprofits in economic and community development, alternative organizational arrangements for nonprofit and social enterprise activity, and public policy issues in specific sub-fields such as health care, social justice, the environment, education and the arts, especially where they have general implications for the nonprofit sector and social enterprise as a whole.

Overall, NPF seeks analyses of current public policy issues, the historical development of public policies affecting nonprofits in various countries, and the practical implications of existing policies for the operations, performance, and social impact of nonprofit organizations and social enterprises.

Review Process

Articles are reviewed on the basis of substance, methodology, originality, acknowledgment of the literature, and relevance to NPF’s readership. Submissions are peer-reviewed in a double-blind process by multiple reviewers with expertise in the topic and relevant disciplines. The review process is structured to provide authors with a rapid response and constructive feedback. Criteria for acceptance include conciseness, clarity of presentation, and general readability.

Contents

In addition to regular research-based articles, NPF welcomes special features including interviews, book reviews, case studies, and policy briefings.

Research-based Articles

  • Articles of approximately 5,000 words reporting original research and analysis on policy-relevant topics of interest to nonprofit policymakers, nonprofit practitioners, social entrepreneurs, and scholars

Special Features—articles of 2,500 words or less as follows:

  • Interviews with policy leaders
  • Book Reviews of the current nonprofit public policy related literature
  • Case Studies of policy developments
  • Policy Briefings of recent legislation, administrative reports, judicial hearings, research reports, task forces, and other relevant documents and proceedings

How to Submit a Manuscript

Papers may be submitted directly to our submission site: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/dgnpf.

Style

A fundamental purpose of NPF is to promote effective communication among researchers, policy-makers, and nonprofit leaders, appealing to a broad audience. Jargon is avoided and technical terms should be explained in non-technical language. Further information on manuscript preparation is available on the website.

Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief
Dennis Young, Georgia State University (emeritus)

Managing Editor
Linda Serra, Independent Consultant

Senior Editorial Board
Alan J. Abramson, George Mason University
Helmut Anheier, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin
Andrea Bassi, University of Bologna
Elizabeth T. Boris, The Urban Institute
Gemma Donnelly-Cox, Trinity College, Dublin
Philippe Eynaud, Sorbonne Graduate Business School, France
James Ferris, University of Southern California
Benjamin Gidron, College of Management Academic Studies, Israel
Virginia A. Hodgkinson, Georgetown University (retired)
Kevin Kearns, University of Pittsburgh
Eliza Lee, Hong Kong University
Michael Meyer, Vienna University of Economics and Business
Myles McGregor-Lowndes, Queensland University of Technology
Marta Reuter, Stockholm University
Mark Rosenman, Union Institute and University (emeritus)
James Allen Smith, The Rockefeller Archive Center
Melissa Stone, University of Minnesota
Isabel Vidal, University of Barcelona
Filip Wijkstrom, Stockholm School of Economics
Naoto Yamauchi, Osaka University


Journal of Ideology (JOI)

The Journal of Ideology (JOI) is a juried interdisciplinary publication intended to serve as a forum of critical high quality scholarly research and theory development. The JOI will encourage publication of essays that promote innovations of ideology that run counter to conventional theory and premises across the social sciences. An acceptable perspective of authors would be that the minority view in a debate of a particular field, discipline, or issue offers a reasonable starting point for discourse.

Submission Guidelines
Because of the counterpoint nature of the JOI content, authors are expected to represent conventional ideology as reflected in the literature of the field. Authors are asked to note that the JOI solicits essays for consideration from across the spectrum of social science, humanities, and applied professions disciplines, and that readers may be unfamiliar with the conventional theory they are attempting to challenge. Hence, vigorous juried review will focus on clarity and logic of argument, and authors are directed to provide space in each submission to articulate the theory and its adherents that are addressed by the counter theory.

Submissions to the JOI cannot be under consideration for other publication in other outlets, and previously copyrighted materials are not acceptable submissions. The Journal of Ideology editors reserve the right to decline to consider or reject submissions for any reason they determine, including inconsistency with the guidelines, purposes, and/or principles of the editors, the journal board of associate editors, sponsoring institutions, and partners.

Submitted materials must be prepared in a manner allowing for blind review, although authors are encouraged to identify a scholarly discipline so that materials may be reviewed by peers generally familiar with the subject matter. They are also encouraged to self-identify an institutional role such as faculty/student collaboration originating in applied research projects or thought exercises based in theoretical inquiry.

Formatting Requirements
Format for the essay are as follows:

  • Papers are limited to 25 pages, double spaced, 12 point font in either Cambria, Calibri, or Times New Roman typeface.
  • Citations should be listed according to APA format. References should be listed single spaced. References do not count toward the 25 page limit.
  • Authors may include footnotes for explanatory purposes.
  • Authors are asked to use major and minor headers.
  • Authors are asked to accurately align Abstract content to clearly reflect the purpose and points of the essay.

Learn more about the journal or submit a paper here:
https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/ji/

By |2019-01-20T19:59:51+00:00January 18th, 2019|
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